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Natural History of Scoliosis: the development of a predictive model

There are two abstracts on the natural history of scoliosis that Isico is going to present at the 56th SRS conference scheduled for next September in the United States: “Predicting Future Curve Severity for Juvenile Idiopathic Scoliosis: A Natural History Study” and “Predicting Future Curve Severity Requires Different Models for Adolescent and Juvenile Idiopathic Scoliosis “.
Abstracts which constitute research carried out by Isico in collaboration with the Canadian University of Alberta and Dr Erik Parent. The preliminary results of this research study will be presented by Prof Stefano Negrini at the Research Grant Outcome Symposium organized by SRS and scheduled for March 6 from 9 to 11 ET US.
Most models to predict future Scoliosis severity have not been validated; many previous samples included treated patients limiting our understanding of the natural history. 

“Our aim was to predict future curve severity at a time point of the clinician’s choice during adolescence using data from x-rays obtained before starting treatment in patients with a diagnosis of Juvenile Idiopathic Scoliosis (JIS) – explains dr Sabrina Donzelli, one of the authors of this research study – we included 2331 patients with a diagnosis of JIS, under age 26, previously untreated.
The data obtained through the radiographs confirm the factors involved in the severity of scoliosis: for juvenile scoliosis the age at onset and the extent of the curve, and for adolescent scoliosis the Risser stage and female gender. The idea is to optimize the use of this data for clinical purposes “.

That is, to be able to validate the model to verify  whether it works for another population with similar characteristics. “During the webinar to which I have been invited – says Prof. Negrini – I will present the preliminary data not only of the two abstracts but also of the other analyses developed by the Canadian university. As a team, we are continuing to validate one model with which we can create an algorithm to predict the cases with the highest development risk.”

SOSORT 2020: all Isico’s abstracts “pass the test”

Isico will once again be in the front line at the International SOSORT meeting, this year being held from 27th to 29th April in Melbourne, Australia, during Spine Week (27th April to 1st May, 2020).

“All the abstracts we presented have been accepted” reports Dr Sabrina Donzelli, Isico physiatrist and author of the research paper that is in the running for the SOSORT Award. “This is an extremely gratifying result, considering the number of abstracts submitted, and it underlines the fact that we remain firmly committed to research. We are also delighted and honoured to feature, once again in the list of the “top ten” studies presented”. 

In short, Isico has, once again, received full marks from the global spine rehabilitation community. Let us not forget that last year the Isico study entitled Effect of sport activity added to full-time bracing in 785 Risser 0-2 adolescents with high degree idiopathic scoliosis, which also featured among the top ten “nominations”, went on to win the SOSORT Award.

Here, then, are the studies that our specialists will be presenting this year in Melbourne: Is swimming helpful or harmful in adolescents with idiopathic scoliosis (Dr Alessandra Negrini, physiotherapist); The effect of dance performance on idiopathic scoliosis progression in adolescents (Dr Michele Romano, physiotherapist), ISYQOL, a Rasch-consistent tool for quality of life evaluation in scoliosis patients during adulthood: comparison with the gold standard (Dr Fabio Zaina, physiatrist).

Finally, Dr Sabrina Donzelli will be giving two lectures. The first one, which is entitled Is clinical measurement of the hump helpful for X-ray prescription and a good predictor of the curve? Results from ageometrical study from a large prospective cohort, was also given at the last SRS meeting, while the second is the one that has been shortlisted for the SOSORT Award: Final results of brace treatment of adolescents with idiopathic scoliosis prediction: 30 days out-of-brace is better than in-brace X-ray.